Dear Rob Manfred, The Millennials Are Leaving

By Max Kaplan, “The voice of the millennial sports fan” We millennials are losing interest and it’s not our fault. We can’t sit through another 4-hour MLB game with 11 pitching changes and 15 walks. We groan every time a batter steps out of the box to re-adjust his batting gloves for the third time since the last pitch. Or when the pitcher starts pacing … Continue reading Dear Rob Manfred, The Millennials Are Leaving

NFL Divisional Realignment for Earth Day

by Max Kaplan   [Late edit] I was featured in an on-air interview to defend this article on Earth Day. Earth Day is coming up on April 22, and even the NFL can do its part to reduce its carbon footprint. I mean, just look at the divisions. Why must the Patriots travel all the way down to Miami every year when there are over twenty … Continue reading NFL Divisional Realignment for Earth Day

Does Order Matter? An Analysis of Round 1 vs Round 2 Picks in the NBA

by Alex Vukasin

 

Are teams really making use of their first round picks? Have scouts been able to pinpoint the best talent with their first round picks, or is the draft round not a significant indicator of the talent and future of players in the league? Continue reading “Does Order Matter? An Analysis of Round 1 vs Round 2 Picks in the NBA”

Ode to the Great Bambino: How the Best of the Best Performed Relative to Their Time Period

by Keith Gladstone   Only the best players of a given era are inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, from classic names like Babe Ruth and Lou Gehrig, to the most recent nominees of Mike Piazza and Ken Griffey Jr. Since the MLB era tainted by PEDs saw unthinkable, sky-high hitting totals, the question of who deserves a seat in the Hall of … Continue reading Ode to the Great Bambino: How the Best of the Best Performed Relative to Their Time Period

The Mets’ World Series offensive collapse was inevitable

by Ben Ulene   After this year’s World Series ended in a Game 5 comeback win for the Royals, plenty of questions remain about what caused the Mets – who almost nobody predicted would go home after just five games – to lose so quickly. While sloppy defense certainly contributed to their collapse, an even bigger liability was their offense, which only managed a meager 7 … Continue reading The Mets’ World Series offensive collapse was inevitable

The Hot Hand: NBA Shot Streaks and the Geometric Distribution

by Neil Rangwani   Each year, as the NBA season kicks off, the “hot hand” debate (or, according to Wikipedia, the hot hand fallacy) resurfaces – are streaks of made shots indicative of a player getting hot, or are they just random occurrences? Here at Princeton Sports Analytics, we’re not happy discussing this with just anecdotal evidence (I mean, did you see Steph last night?), so … Continue reading The Hot Hand: NBA Shot Streaks and the Geometric Distribution

3v3 Overtime is Working

By Antonio Papa This season, the NHL has initiated a rule change to create more overtime goals and fewer shootouts. Now, overtime play will be 3-on-3, instead of 4-on-4. A quick statistical analysis shows us that the new rule has – and will continue to – increase overtime scoring. Shootouts were added after the 2005-06 lockout as an alternative to ties in the regular season, but … Continue reading 3v3 Overtime is Working